What is Good Running Form? (Part 1)

On May 22nd, 2017, posted in: General, Running by 0 Comment
What is Good Running Form? (Part 1)

I want to talk to you today about running form. Here in Austin, Texas, we have a large running community and we treat tons of runners of all shapes and sizes. And one of the biggest questions that we often get is, “What is good running form?” Watch the video below to hear my answer and leave any questions you may have in the comments section below.

 

 

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Video Transcription (please excuse grammatical errors and the conversational nature of the transcription):

 

“Hey Guys, Ben here from Carter PT. I want to talk to you today about running form. Here in Austin, Texas, we have a large running community and we treat tons of runners of all shapes and sizes. And one of the biggest questions that we often get is, “What is good running form?”

It’s kind of a difficult question to answer, to be honest, because running form for one person might look like one thing, and running form for a different person might look totally different. But we see some common threads throughout running forms.

We don’t often make a big deal in the world of running about our glutes. Our glutes are these big, powerful muscles behind that provide a lot of power, but they don’t provide a lot of support and stability while we’re running. And actually, they’re not terribly active while we’re running. While they’re important, we really like to focus on strengthening the hamstrings.

One of the biggest things I see in the clinic when I do high speed running analysis is that people just don’t use their hamstrings enough. And often what we see is when we test people’s hamstrings, they cramp very easily, which lets us know that they’re not very strong in their hamstrings.

I’ve never had a runner complain to me: “You know what? My hamstrings are incredibly sore.” They’ll often say their hips are sore and their quads are sore after running up and down hills, but they almost never say their hamstrings are sore.

So one thing you consider is doing a high speed running analysis. And what that is is looking at frame by frame at 120 frames per second in HD quality to see is there any deficits in your running form. And we often see that the hamstrings are often the culprit and we want to focus on strengthening them.

But there are other things we want to look at in the running analysis as well. What’s your foot strike pattern? What does your knee look like at impact?

These are things we just can’t see with the bare eye, just not enough. My vision is not that good to see you run really fast on a treadmill and pick up all your deficiencies, but a high-speed camera provides an opportunity that I just can’t see otherwise.

So if you’re interested in that, go to CarterPT.com and contact us today for a running analysis. Thank you. Take care.”

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